AATSEEL Annual Awards

Submit a recommendation for:

AATSEEL Prize for Teaching and Service or AATSEEL Book Award

The AATSEEL Publications Committee is responsible for overseeing the appointment of editors for the AATSEEL Newsletter and Slavic and East European Journal, and also for the award of prizes for publications in the various disciplines participating in AATSEEL. For information on our activities, please follow the appropriate link below:

    Nominees for the 2021 AATSEEL book prizes

    Best First Book Award:

  • From Internationalism to Postcolonialism: Literature and Cinema between the Second and the Third World by Rossen Djagalov (McGill-Queen's UP, 2020)
  • Picturing the Page by Megan Swift (University of Toronto Press, 2020)
  • Superfluous Women by Jessica Zychowicz (University of Toronto Press, 2020)
  • Pushkin's Monument and Allusion by Sidney Eric Dement (University of Toronto Press, 2019)
  • Bridging East and West by Yuliya Ladygina (University of Toronto Press, 2019)
  • Ukrainian Women Writers and the National Imaginary by Oleksandra Wallo (University of Toronto Press, 2019)
  • Psychomotor Aesthetics: Movement and Affect in Modern Literature and Film by Ana Hedberg Olenina (Oxford University Press, 2020)
  • Dostoevsky and the Ethics of Narrative Form: Suspense, Closure, Minor Characters by Greta Matzner-Gore (Northwestern University Press, 2020)
  • Reader as Accomplice: Narrative Ethics in Dostoevsky and Nabokov by Alexander Spektor (Northwestern University Press, 2020)
  • Russia’s Capitalist Realism: Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov by Vadim Shneyder (Northwestern University Press, 2020)
  • Queer Transgressions in Twentieth-Century Polish Fiction: Gender, Nation, Politics by Jack J. Hutchens (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2020)
  • It Will Be Fun and Terrifying: Nationalism and Protest in Post-Soviet Russia by Fabrizio Fenghi (University of Wisconsin Press, 2020).

    Best Book in Literary/Cultural Studies:

  • From Internationalism to Postcolonialism: Literature and Cinema between the Second and the Third World by Rossen Djagalov (McGill-Queen's UP, 2020)
  • Conspiracy Culture by Keith A. Livers (University of Toronto Press, 2020)
  • Picturing the Page by Megan Swift (University of Toronto Press, 2020)
  • Superfluous Women by Jessica Zychowicz (University of Toronto Press, 2020)
  • Ukrainian Epic and Historical Song by Natalie Kononenko (University of Toronto Press, 2019)
  • Pushkin's Monument and Allusion by Sidney Eric Dement (University of Toronto Press, 2019)
  • Bridging East and West by Yuliya V. Ladygina (University of Toronto Press, 2019)
  • Ukrainian Women Writers and the National Imaginary by Oleksandra Wallo (University of Toronto Press, 2019)
  • Travels from Dostoevsky’s Siberia: Encounters with Polish Literary Exiles by Elizabeth Blake (Academic Studies Press, 2020)
  • Breaking Free from Death: The Art of Being a Successful Russian Writer by Galina Rylkova (Academic Studies Press, 2020)
  • The Ghost of Shakespeare by Anna Frajlich (Academic Studies Press, 2020)
  • She Animates: Soviet Female Subjectivity in Russian Animation by Michele Leigh & Lora Mjolsness (Academic Studies Press, 2020)
  • A Reader’s Companion to Mikhail Bulgakov’s “The Master and Margarita” by J. A. E. Curtis (Academic Studies Press, 2019)
  • Wingless Desire in Modernist Russia: Envy and Authorship in the 1920s by Yelena Zotova (Lexington Books, 2020)
  • Psychomotor Aesthetics: Movement and Affect in Modern Literature and Film by Ana Hedberg Olenina (Oxford University Press, 2020)
  • The Bilingual Muse: Self-Translation among Russian Poets by Adrian Wanner (Northwestern University Press, 2020)
  • Dostoevsky and the Ethics of Narrative Form: Suspense, Closure, Minor Characters by Greta Matzner-Gore (Northwestern University Press, 2020)
  • The Soviet Writers’ Union and Its Leaders: Identity and Authority under Stalin by Carol Any (Northwestern University Press, 2020)
  • Reader as Accomplice: Narrative Ethics in Dostoevsky and Nabokov by Alexander Spektor (Northwestern University Press, 2020)
  • Pelevin and Unfreedom: Poetics, Politics, Metaphysics by Sofya Khagi (Northwestern University Press, 2020)
  • Hunting Nature: Ivan Turgenev and the Organic World by Thomas P. Hodge (Cornell University Press, 2020)
  • Haunted Empire: Gothic and the Russian Imperial Uncanny by Valeria Sobol (Cornell University Press, 2020)
  • It Will Be Fun and Terrifying: Nationalism and Protest in Post-Soviet Russia by Fabrizio Fenghi (University of Wisconsin Press, 2020)
  • Faster, Stronger, Higher, Comrades!: Sports, Art, and Ideology in Late Russian and Early Soviet Culture by Tim Harte (University of Wisconsin Press, 2020)
  • Songs in Dark Times: Yiddish Poetry of Struggle from Scottsboro to Palestine by Amelia M. Glaser (Harvard University Press, 2020)
  • Survival on the Margins. Polish Jewish Refugees in the Wartime Soviet Union by Eliyana R. Adler (Harvard University Press, 2020)
  • Moscow Monumental: Soviet Skyscrapers and Urban Life in Stalin's Capital by Katherine Zubovich (Princeton University Press, 2020)
  • Stalin: Passage to Revolution by Ronald Grigor Suny (Princeton University Press, 2020)
  • Late Stalinism by Evgeny Dobrenko (Yale University Press, 2020)
  • The Collector. The Story of Sergei Shchukin and His Lost Masterpieces by Natalya Semenova with André Delocque (Yale University Press, 2020)

    Best Edited Multi-Author Scholarly Volume:

  • Cinemasaurus: Russian Film in Contemporary Context. Edited by Nancy Condee, Alexander Prokhorov, and Elena Prokhorova (Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2020)
  • Comintern Aesthetics, ed. by Amelia M. Glaser and Steven S. Lee (University of Toronto Press, 2020)
  • H.G. Wells and All Things Russian. Ed. by Galya Diment (Anthem Press, 2020)
  • A Companion to Soviet Children's Literature and Film. Ed. by Olga Voronina (Brill, 2019)
  • Cold War II: Hollywood's Renewed Obsession with Russia, ed. By Tatiana Prorokova-Konrad (University Press of Mississippi, 2020)

    Best Translation into English:

  • Newcomers: Book 2 by Lojze Kovačič. Translated into English from the Slovenian by Michael Biggins (Archipelago Books, 2020)
  • 21: Russian Short Prose from the Odd Century edited by Mark Lipovetsky (Academic Studies Press, 2020)
  • Permanent Evolution: Selected Essays on Literature, Theory and Film by Yuri Tynianov. Translated and edited by Ainsley Morse & Philip Redko. With an introduction by Daria Khitrova (Academic Studies Press, 2019)
  • A New Orthography by Serhiy Zhadan. Poems translated by John Hennessy & Ostap Kin (Lost Horse Press, 2020)
  • Smokes by Yuri Izdryk. Poems translated by Roman Ivashkiv & Erin Moure (Lost Horse Press, 2019)
  • Pray to the Empty Wells by Iryna Shuvalova. Poems translated by Olena Jennings & the Author (Lost Horse Press, 2019)
  • Mountain & Flower: Selected Poems of Mykola Vorobiov. Poems translated by Maria G. Rewakowicz (Lost Horse Press, 2020)
  • Juri Lotman - Culture, Memory and History. Essays in Cultural Semiotics. Ed. Marek Tamm. Translated from the Russian by Brian James Baer (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
  • Empiriomonism: Essays in Philosophy Books 1-3 by Alexander Bogdanov, edited and translated by David G. Rowley (Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2020)
  • Russia Washed in Blood A novel in fragments by Artyom Vesyoly, translated by Kevin Windle, with an introduction by Kevin Windle and Elena Govor (New York & London, Anthem Press, 2020)
  • The Nose and Other Stories by Nikolai Gogol, translated by Susanne Fusso (Columbia University Press, 2020)
  • Journey from St. Petersburg to Moscow by Alexander Radishchev translated by Andrew Kahn and Irina Reyfman (Columbia University Press, 2020)
  • To the Ashes by Anzhelina Polonskaya, translated from Russian by Andrew Wachtel (Zephyr Press, 2019)
  • Paper-Thin Skin by Aigerim Tazhi, translated from Russian by J. Kates (Zephyr Press, 2019)
  • Breathing Technique by Marija Knežević, translated from Serbian by Sibelan Forrester (Zephyr Press, 2020)
  • Night Truck Driver by Marcin Świetlicki, translated from Polish by Elżbieta Wójcik-Leese (Zephyr Press, 2020)
  • Abigail by Magda Szabo, translated by Len Rix (New York Review Books, 2020)
  • Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk: Selected Stories of Nikolai Leskov, translated by Donald Rayfield, Robert Chandler and William Edgerton (New York Review Books, 2020)
  • Unwitting Street by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, translated by Joanne Turnbull (New York Review Books, 2020)
  • Sketches of the Criminal World: Further Kolyma Stories by Varlam Shalamov, translated by Donald Rayfield (New York Review Books, 2020)
  • Stalingrad by Vasily Grossman, translated by Robert Chandler and Elizabeth Chandler (New York Review Books, 2019)
  • Rock Paper Scissors: And Other Stories by Maxim Osipov, translated by Boris Dralyuk, Alex Fleming, and Anne Marie Jackson (New York Review Books, 2019)
  • Twenty Years in a Siberian Gulag: Memoir of a Political Prisoner at Kolyma by Leonid Petrovich Bolotov, translated by Irina Y. Barclay (McFarland, 2020)

    Linguistics And Language Pedagogy:

  • Decoding the 1920s: A Reader for Advanced Learners of Russian by Nila Friedberg (2021, PDXOpen: Open Educational Resources. 33. https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/pdxopen/33)
  • The Art of Teaching Russian. Edited by Evgeny Dengub, Irina Dubinina, and Jason Merrill (Georgetown University Press, 2020)

      Eligibility requirements and selection procedures for the AATSEEL book prizes:

      AATSEEL awards prizes to outstanding publications in the fields of 1) literary and/or cultural scholarship, 2) the best first book, 3) Edited Multi-Author Scholarly Volume, 4) translations into English, and 5) language pedagogy and linguistics. For more on the specific eligibility requirements of the individual prizes, and for recent recipients of the prizes, see below. General eligibility requirements and nomination procedures pertinent to all the prizes include:
      1. In order to be eligible for consideration for an AATSEEL Book Award, the author (not the nominator) must be a member of AATSEEL. In the case of books written by more than one author, at least one one of the authors must be a member of AATSEEL. Books by individuals who are not members of AATSEEL (or books written by teams of authors none of whom is a member of AATSEEL) cannot be considered for an AATSEEL book award.
      2. Nominated works must be devoted to the languages and the literary/cultural traditions of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.
      3. For the prizes in linguistics, literary/cultural scholarship, the best first book and translation, works nominated must have been published within the two preceding calendar years. For the prize in language pedagogy, works nominated must have been published within the three preceding calendar years.
      4. The nomination process will normally end on 1 May. Prizes will be announced at the annual meeting of AATSEEL in early January.
      5. Both members of AATSEEL and non-members may make nominations for the prizes.
      6. In order to make a nomination for one of the prizes, one need only send an e-mail message to the chair of the publications committee (see "contact information" below). The chair will then contact the press. Presses wishing to nominate books should send a single copy of the work to the chair, who will (shortly after May 1) supply a list of the relevant jurors and their addresses. Presses are then asked to send a copy of the book directly to each of the jurors.

      Specific eligibility guidelines for each prize:

      Best Contribution to Language Pedagogy:

      The prize in pedagogy may recognize either language-pedagogical materials or contributions to literature on the theory and practice of language teaching. The former category should be understood broadly to include textbooks, computer software, testing materials, and other instructional tools. Nominated works in the latter category should be single or multi-author books. At the committee's discretion, the prize may in some years be granted not to a single publication, but to the aggregate works of one individual whose publications as a whole have made an outstanding contribution to the field of language pedagogy.

      Best Contribution to the Study of Slavic Linguistics:

      Nominated works should be scholarly monographs (including grammars and dictionaries) that treat topics in any field of linguistic inquiry. Typically, translated and edited volumes would not be considered.

      Best Book in Literary/Cultural Scholarship:

      Nominated works should be scholarly books which treat topics in any field of literary or cultural studies. Normally, this will exclude works of historical scholarship, unless these are devoted to the history of literary or cultural institutions or to interdisciplinary topics uniting history and cultural life.

      The Best First Book Award:

      This prize is established in recognition of the best first scholarly monograph published in the field of literary or cultural scholarship that demonstrates original and ground-breaking work by an emerging scholar.

      Best Edited Multi-Author Scholarly Volume:

      Nominated works should be edited, multi-author, scholarly volumes treating topics in any field of literary or cultural studies. As with the “Best Book in Literary/Cultural Scholarly” category, this will normally exclude works of historical scholarship, unless these are devoted to the history of literary or cultural institutions or to interdisciplinary topics uniting history and cultural life. The prize will be awarded on the basis of criteria including (but not limited to): originality, coherence as unified project, importance to the discipline, and quality of research and writing.

      ADDITIONAL CRITERIA for COLLECTIONS:

      1.Framing: does the editor(s) provide a cogent conceptual framing for the volume that highlights its original contribution to the field and connects the individual chapters;

      2.Framework: are the contributions arranged in sections that reflect the conceptual framing offered in the introduction and in an order that makes sense (i.e., that connects the individual contributions to one another and to the conceptualization of the volume as a whole);

      3.Individual contributions: are the individual chapters of consistently high quality in terms of (a) the relevance and originality of the argument; (b) the rigor and comprehensiveness of the research; and (c) the clarity and effectiveness of the writing/exposition.

      Best Translation into English:

      Nominees for this prize should be book-length translations of a literary work, an epiliterary genre (letters, memoirs, essays, etc.), or a scholarly work. At the discretion of the jury, two prizes may be awarded, one for a literary or epiliterary work, the other for a translation of a strictly scholarly character.

        Conflict of interest statement:

        The following disqualify a book from consideration: 1. If a juror has written the book. 2. If a juror has written an introduction, afterword, or any other part of the book. (The only exception to this is a blurb: this is not a significant enough contribution to disqualify a book.) 3. If a juror contributed substantially to a book, albeit in an uncredited role. For example, if a juror has worked closely with the author on that book (advised the dissertation on which it is based or edited the final product). 4. If a juror is married to the author of a book or romantically involved with the author.

          Publications Committee membership and contact information

          The AATSEEL Publications Committee consists of fifteen members who serve staggered three-year terms, each of whom is assigned to one of four book-prize juries corresponding to his or her disciplinary affiliation and qualifications.

          All correspondence for the committee should be addressed to the current chair (term ends Dec. 2022):

          Professor Yuri Leving
          Department of Russian Studies
          Dalhousie University
          McCain Arts, 6135 University Ave.
          PO BOX 15000, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
          (902) 494-1082
          Email: yleving@gmail.com

          Jury for the 2021 AATSEEL book prizes

          Linguistics and Language pedagogy jury:

          • Andriy Danylenko, Pace University (term ends Dec. 2021), Coordinator
          • Cynthia L. Martin, University of Maryland (term ends Dec. 2021)
          • Maria Shardakova, Indiana University (term ends Dec 2021)
          • Richard Robin, George Washington University (term ends Dec. 2023)

          Literary/cultural studies jury:

          • Frederick H. White, Utah Valley University (term end Dec. 2022), Coordinator
          • Eliot Borenstein, New York University (term ends Dec. 2023)
          • Maria Khotimsky, MIT (term ends Dec. 2023)

          Edited Multi-Author Scholarly Volume jury:

          • Helena Goscilo, The Ohio State University (term ends Dec. 2022), Coordinator
          • Brian Baer, Kent State University (term ends Dec. 2023)
          • Marina Balina, Illinois Wesleyan University (term ends Dec. 2023)

          Translation jury:

          • Celia Hawkesworth, Oxford (term ends Dec. 2021),
          • Hilde Hoogenboom, Arizona State University (term ends Dec. 2021)
          • Bill Johnston, Indiana University (term ends Dec. 2023)
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